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Everyday Dialogues: Calling For a Flat

Aprile 2018
Volete affittare un appartamento, in inglese? Ecco un pratico dialogo con tutto il vocabolario necessario!

di Mariam Khan

File audio:

clicca qui per andare alla relativa traccia audio (contrassegnata dalla scritta "speaker")


Speakers: Molly Malcolm (American accent), Alex Warner (British accent)

Anne:

Hello. I’m calling about the room you advertised in the Gazette. Is it still available?

Letting agent:

We advertised several. We’re a letting agency, you see. Which one are you interested in?

Anne:

The one in Blythe Road for £180 per week.

Letting agent:

Ah, yes, that’s still available, but we’re getting a lot of calls about it. It’s a lovely room, carpeted, with a double bed and a garden view. Can you tell me a little about yourself? Are you employed?

Anne:

Well, actually, I’m a student, but I’ve just got a part-time job waiting tables in the evenings.

Letting agent:

That’s good. Will you be able to provide references?

Anne:

Yes, my old landlord can vouch for me, and my supervisor at the university as well. How many people are sharing the flat?

Letting agent:

Four, including the new tenant. There are four large bedrooms and the kitchen, bathroom and living room are shared. The other three rooms are occupied by students, as well.

Anne:

What about the kitchen – is it fully equipped?

Letting agent:

Yes, there’s a cooker, an oven, a microwave, a kettle, a dishwasher and an enormous fridge. There are cooking utensils, cutlery, crockery, everything you need. The only thing it doesn’t have is a washing machine, but there’s a launderette just down the road.

Anne:

Sounds perfect. What about wi-fi and utilities? Are they included in the rent?

Letting agent:

Yes, all included. Shall we schedule a viewing?

Anne:

Absolutely!

NOW LET'S REVIEW THE VOCABULARY

There are agencies dedicated to selling and letting properties. A letting agency specialises in finding tenants for property owners. This is called ‘letting’.

Carpeted’ means that the floor is completely covered with carpet.

A ‘part-time job’ (as opposed to a ‘full-time job’) is a job for a reduced length of time, for example, half-days, evenings or weekends only.

When he says he is ‘waiting tables’, the student means he is a waiter in a café, bar or restaurant.

To ‘vouch for’ someone means to assure a third party of someone’s good character.

A tenant is a person who rents accommodation.

Fully equipped’ is a common phrase used (in this scenario) to ask if a room has all the standard equipment.

Every British household has a kettle, usually an electric water heater, in the kitchen. How else would you make all those cups of tea?

Cooking utensils’ are the pots and pans you need for cooking.

Cutlery’ means forks, knives, spoons, etc.

Crockery’ means tableware, like dishes, plates, cups and other similar items.

A launderette is a public place with coin-operated washing machines. They often offer service washes, where you pay a person to do your laundry, so you don’t have to stay and wait.

Just down the road’ could mean literally situated further along the same road, or it could simply mean nearby.

In these situations, utilities refers to services like water, gas and electricity. Some tenancy agreements include these in the rent; others do not and the tenants pay their share when the bills arrive.

To listen to the article "Improve! - Among Fellow Students" with more language tips, click here.




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