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Holland Park


Holland Park è uno dei meravigliosi parchi di Londra. Si trova a due passi da Notting Hill, ha un fantastico giardino giapponese ed è una meravigliosa oasi naturale. Abbiamo incontrato Yannick Pucci, la guida del parco, e Trevor Bowyer, che lavora all’Holland Park Ecology Centre, ecco cosa ci hanno raccontato...

Yannick Pucci (Luxembourgeois accent)

Hello, dear Speak Up readers. My name is Yannick and I’m a tour guide here in London and here today we are in Holland Park, particularly the Kyoto Garden, which was built in 1991, and which is really a beautiful showcase of Japanese garden design.

Speaker: Mark Worden (Standard British accent)
Holland Park is one of London’s hidden treasures, being smaller and less well known than many of the English capital’s other parks. It has only been open to the public since 1952. Before then it was part of a stately home, Holland House, which was built in the early 17th century. In the 19th century it was a fashionable address because Lord and Lady Holland entertained lavishly. The 20th century was less kind to Holland House: it was hit by a bomb, as Yannick Pucci tells us:

Yannick Pucci

So here we’re sitting in front of Holland House, or rather the ruins, and what remains of it. So this used to be one of the grand houses here in London, but unfortunately most of it was destroyed during World War Two, and there is just the east wing still left, which is nowadays a youth hostel, so in case you want to come visit London, this might be a place where you want to stay as… it’s not as grand, but still it gives you a bit of a feeling for how people would have lived back then, and you also have this very nice park as a backdrop and you can relax and enjoy all the different pieces of scenery.

Speaker: Mark Worden (Standard British accent)
You certainly can. Holland Park is a nature oasis, as Trevor Bowyer, who works at the Holland Park Ecology Centre, explains:

Trevor Bowyer (Standard British/London accent)

Holland Park is very good as a nature oasis because of the amount of mature woodland we have around the park, and we also encourage extra wildlife in by a programme of feeding stations for birds, and nest boxes in the park. So, unlike most of the parks in London, we have quite a lot of hidden enclosures, full of holly, brambles, nettles, things that wildlife like, but perhaps the gardener doesn’t, where wildlife can make it home. So, come spring, summer time, you’ll see lots of autumn… I’m sorry, lots of spring birds making their nests in the park, and lots of migrating birds passing through the park, like swallows and swifts. Come summer you will see, hopefully, lots of butterflies, depending on the weather, ‘cause we leave lots of plants that the butterflies can lay their eggs on, and make their home in the park. And then, come this time, autumn, the park is often a blaze of colour on the leaves and the trees, lots of… different seeds and fruits that the birds and mammals can take for their winter storage, and you’ll see lots of squirrels burying things into the ground. So, in some way, it’s a very good park for wildlife. We kind of lack some water features, but that’s made up (for) by the nice woodland areas that we have.

(Yannick Pucci and Trevor Bowyer were talking to Mark Worden)

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